Podcast: Do you need jargon in effective B2B marketing copy?

Jargon (be it tech jargon or its close cousin, business speak) is often criticised in B2B copy. But does it have a role to play? Listen now, and find out how to leverage jargon for maximum impactfulness.

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You may think you can escape using jargon in your B2B copy. You may believe that you need to write in a way that your Auntie Kathleen can understand. Alternatively, you might feel that your copy isn’t professional unless it’s couched in the latest technical and business speak. Which is right?

It’s easy to see why technical jargon has a place in B2B marketing copy – you need to call things by the same terms the audience is using. Using industry jargon in context can mark your copy out as relevant to customers.

Even copy laden with full-on business speak can have its place in the B2B copy landscape. It’s all a matter of context and audience.

But how do you do that, without turning your copy into meaningless business BS? Can you use jargon and still stand out?

Join Fiona, David, and me as we take a journey down a linguistical rabbit hole, and find out how to effectively use jargon in business-to-business marketing copy.

Listen now and find out:

  • The importance of speaking your audience’s language
  • Why plain English isn’t always the answer
  • How language affects the credibility of copy
  • Business guff that does need to go
  • … and more

Ready to give it a listen?

You can download the episode here (right-click and “save-as” to download). Or stream the episode in the player at the top of the page.

(Or you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes here. Alternatively, add our RSS to your preferred podcast player.)

Stuff we mentioned

You can find that awesome article on corporate claptrap, by Lucy Kellaway, for FT.com, here.

Check out the picture of that Pokémon and coding language infused recruitment profile here.

And you can see the “Accelerating Next” copy in Fiona’s blog post on why you need to stop using the present participle in your headlines.

Credits:

Intro and outro music by Industrial and Marine.

Header image adapted from photo by Caleb Rogers on Unsplash.

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