Kung Fu Secrets of B2B Copywriting: Read it Out Loud

If your copy feels wrong, and you don’t know why, reading will usually make the problem plain. This quick video explains why.

Sometimes your copy isn’t working, and you can’t put your finger on why. Nine times out of ten, reading out loud will make the problem obvious.

Even in the driest B2B copy, rhythm is essential. So (even if it’s a little embarrassing) reading aloud lets you get to grips with the sound of the words, and shows you exactly where you’re losing your way.

(Tip: generally, it’s because there’s a sentence that’s too long for its own good, or a paragraph that ends with a weak adverb.)

This video, from a presentation in 2015, makes much the same point. In summary:

When you’re writing something — you might be embarrassed to do it and feel silly — but read it out loud as you write it.

Because a lot of the time you look at something, and it’s not quite right somehow… and then you read it out loud and the problem is suddenly apparent.

Usually the problem is that the sentence is far too long, actually.

But if your sentence is too long, if it’s just too wordy, or if you’re lapsing into using jargon and buzzwords, reading it out loud will reveal that to you.

If the sentence that you’re writing is just kind of boring and weak, it might be it’s got no rhythm to it. The sound of the words – and the rhythm of the words – are really important.

And reading out loud is the only way to really reveal that.

Want more copywriting tips?

Check out the next video, and find out why exclamation marks are not your friend.

(Or watch the full Kung Fu Copywriting playlist here.)


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